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Watch “Ocean Crimes” on YouTube

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LAWLESS OCEANS   ■  SEASON 1  EPISODE 6

Over six gripping episodes Karsten von Hoesslin investigates multiple murders at sea and reveals the shocking extent of maritime crime from drugs to piracy   

Just another day investigating murder on the ocean in real time.

Solve Infamous Viral YouTube Video Shooting

new six-part series, Lawless Oceans, which premieres Jan. 10, beginning at 9 p.m. ET, von Hoesslin searches for answers about who killed the men. Along the way, von Hoesslin encounters drug smuggling, human trafficking, illegal fishing and piracy — and more.

‘’This video is just the tip of the iceberg in this case,” von Hoesslin tells PEOPLE.

“Since it is still an active investigation, I would not be surprised if the case only became even more dangerous.”

• Want to keep up with the latest crime coverage? Click here to get breaking crime news, ongoing trial coverage and details of intriguing unsolved cases in the True Crime Newsletter.

The series follows the veteran investigator as he travels the world — from Southeast Asia to the Indian Ocean — searching for leads. It all starts with the disturbing video, which shows other men laughing after the victims were shot in the water.

Recorded at 480p

https://youtu.be/3uLNdc1r_Yk

WATCH NOW

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Stop the Air Force from Bombing Hundreds of Dolphins and Whales!

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//www.thepetitionsite.com/embed.js

217,646 SUPPORTERS

220,000 GOAL

The U.S. Air Force plans to drop 100 bombs, as large as 300 pounds each, on the waters north of Kauai, Hawaii, each year for the next five years. The Air Force has requested permission to harm 637 whales and dolphins in executing this endeavor. If this plan is approved by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA-Fisheries), it is estimated that dozens of marine mammals would be permanently deafened, and hundreds would suffer from temporary hearing loss and changes in natural behavior. Species that would be affected include the humpback whale, sei whale, minke whale, and Fraser dolphin.

The Air Force has proposed protecting dolphins and whales by looking for them on the surface of the water, a ridiculous strategy given that the waters in the area are more than 15,000 feet deep.

The negative impact of ocean noise on whales and dolphins has been well documented. Marine mammals depend upon sound to navigate, find mates, hunt, and communicate over hundreds of miles. Without the ability to hear, they are rendered unable to perform the most basic tasks necessary to their survival. Noise from military testing, as well as commercial shipping and oil and gas exploration, has caused trauma, deafness, and led to the mass beachings and deaths of dolphins and whales around the world.

As an animal lover, I am deeply saddened that beautiful, intelligent marine mammals around the world are suffering horrifically because of noise pollution caused by humanity. Collateral damage to innocent wildlife should not be considered an acceptable consequence of military testing. Please sign this petition urging NOAA-Fisheries to block plans by the U.S. Air Force that would cause harm to dolphins or whales. 


For marine mammals to survive and flourish, we must stop noise pollution in our oceans. Any testing plans by the military must give meaningful and effective protection to these magnificent beings.

FEB 2017



FEB 2017

Associated Press

LIHUE, Hawaii — The Air Force wants to resume its weapons testing program at the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai, but some are concerned about the potential impacts on marine animals.

The Air Force in December filed a request seeking authorization for the testing from the National Marine Fisheries Service. A public comment period on the request ends Monday, The Garden Island reported.

The five-year testing of mainly bombers and fighter aircraft would start in September. It would involve the detonation of a variety of missiles and other weapons about 50 miles offshore of Kauai.

LIHUE, Hawaii — The Air Force wants to resume its weapons testing program at the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai, but some are concerned about the potential impacts on marine animals.

The Air Force in December filed a request seeking authorization for the testing from the National Marine Fisheries Service. A public comment period on the request ends Monday, The Garden Island reported.

The five-year testing of mainly bombers and fighter aircraft would start in September. It would involve the detonation of a variety of missiles and other weapons about 50 miles offshore of Kauai.

FEB 2017
Associated Press

LIHUE, Hawaii — The Air Force wants to resume its weapons testing program at the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai, but some are concerned about the potential impacts on marine animals.

The Air Force in December filed a request seeking authorization for the testing from the National Marine Fisheries Service. A public comment period on the request ends Monday, The Garden Island reported.

The five-year testing of mainly bombers and fighter aircraft would start in September. It would involve the detonation of a variety of missiles and other weapons about 50 miles offshore of Kauai.

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Netting Billions: A Global Valuation of Tuna

http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/reports/2016/05/netting-billions-a-global-valuation-of-tuna

The reality is that fisheries management decisions continue to be based predominantly on the short-term economic bottom line—the amount of value gained or lost by fishing on any given day. That must change.

Fishery managers should enact policies that at a minimum restore depleted stocks to healthy levels, which should include setting science-based catch limits and developing systems of pre-agreed management actions that would be triggered when stocks fall below certain levels.

With a conservative annual value over $40 billion, tuna fisheries represent a significant component of the global economy. Improved management of these fisheries and conservation of tuna stocks are critical to sustaining the health and well-being of marine ecosystems, as well as the industries and coastal peoples who rely on the life in these waters for income and food.

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Perfect Ocean coastline for Oil ?

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After taking more than $700,000 in donations from Kinder After taking more than $700,000 in donations from Kinder Morgan and  There is no such thing as world-class oil spill response, prevention and recovery.  Tweet This!

 partners, Christy Clark approved the company’s pipeline project — a As we have stressed repeatedly, there is no such thing as world-leading or world-class oil spill response, prevention and recovery. The existing yardstick is wholly inadequate as estimates of open-water recovery by mechanical equipment are 10 to 15 per cent of the oil from a marine spill, at best. As we have learned from previous spills, no response is possible in rough weather, high seas and dangerous conditions. Importantly, these conditions often precede, or follow, oil spills. Pumping and skimming recovery options are ineffective in over one knot of tide or in waves and choppy waters. In rough conditions or offshore spills, response is limited to the use of dispersants, as containment is not an option. Dispersants have proven to be largely unsuccessful on water-in-oil emulsions and on oil that has weathered, and will not likely be successful on diluted bitumen. Furthermore, reliable knowledge regarding the extent of dispersant toxicity is lacking.

The Canadian Coast Guard has also identified the uncertainty around the effectiveness of spill response for the diluted bitumen that Kinder Morgan plans to transport from Alberta’s oil sands. In its submission to the joint review panel assessing the Enbridge Northern Gateway project, the coast guard stated it was “not aware of a scientific consensus regarding how these products will behave once introduced into the marine environment or the effects over time of the products being in the water. The Canadian Coast Guard therefore is uncertain whether or not traditional oil spill recovery methods would be effective.”

You can support our research and protect the coast by becoming a donor.

Donate now 

The coast guard’s fear that diluted bitumen could submerge or sink has been reinforced by top chemical scientists in a U.S. National Academy of Sciences study. (Parenthetically, the aforementioned study was capriciously refused into evidence for the Trans Mountain federal review by the National Energy Board). But this would not be the only impact of a diluted bitumen spill. If a slick hits the water, it would immediately release dangerous components that are toxic to fish and animals. No technology can recover those volatile components. The bottom line on the B.C. coast, as has been shown elsewhere, is that arriving on the scene within the NEB-mandated 36 hours does not necessarily translate into effective cleanup of an oil spill.

With grossly overstated oil spill response capabilities revealed after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster, it was evident that improvements to oil spill technology have been negligible. Responders in the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill indicated that cleanup technology was no further ahead than in the 15 years previous. Responders in the Deepwater Horizon spill claimed that cleanup technologies were essentially the same as in the Exxon Valdez spill. Thus, despite some minor improvements, oil spill recovery remains largely unchanged over the last three decades. Notably, the spill response in these situations was nothing like what had been promised by the oil companies.

Another reality of so-called world-class response and prevention is the fact that human failures account for up to 80 per cent of the world’s oil spills. State-of-the-art navigation does not compensate for human error. Major oil spills show that despite assurances of low risk and advanced technology, poor decisions still lead to major incidents. Groundings, collisions, equipment failures and explosions are all cited as causes for accidents, but these are consequences, not causes. Root causes of incidents are more insidious, with human error and miscommunication foremost among them.


This article was first published at the Vancouver Sun, 2017, February 9th: http://vancouversun.com/opinion/opinion-christy-clarks-five-conditions-con that puts the health and safety of British Columbians in jeopardy. After taking The battle lines are drawn — in some cases literally. On one side are those reaping massive profits from fossil fuels, determined to extract and sell as much as possible before the market dries up. On the other are those who see the amazing potential of energy conservation, renewable energy and other innovations to reduce pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, ecosystem destruction and exploitation of valuable non-renewable resources.

Despite international initiatives like the 2015 Paris Agreement, based on decades of research and evidence from around the world about human-caused global warming, those who would risk human health and survival for short-term profits from a destructive sunset industry appear to have the upper hand — for now. The election of a U.S. president and vice-president who deny the very existence of anthropogenic climate change and who have appointed likeminded people and industry executives to key positions illustrates how entrenched those committed to outdated, albeit still profitable, energy sources and technologies are.


 t


han $700,000 in donations from Kinder Morgan and their industry partners, Christy Clark approved the company’s pipeline project — a move that puts the health and safety of British Columbians in jeopardy. their industry partners, Christy Clark approved the company’s pipeline project — a move that puts the health and safety of British C

fffolumbians in jeopardy.

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CCG

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CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent

LSL HalifaxHarbour.jpg

The icebreaker and flagship of the Canadian Coast Guard, CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent under way in Halifax Harbour, escorted by CFAV Glenside in the foreground.

History
Canada
Name: Louis S. St-Laurent
Namesake: Louis St. Laurent
Owner: Government of Canada
Operator: Canadian Coast Guard
Port of registry: Ottawa, Ontario
Route: Atlantic coastline and eastern Arctic
Builder: Canadian VickersMontrealQuebec
Launched: 3 June 1966
Commissioned: 1969
In service: 1969–present
Refit:
Homeport: CCG Base St. John’s, NL (Newfoundland and Labrador Region)
Identification:
Status: in active service
General characteristics [2]
Type: Icebreaker
Tonnage:
Displacement: 15,324 tons (full)[3]
Length: 119.8 m (393.04 ft)
Beam: 24.38 m (79.99 ft)
Draught: 9.91 m (32.51 ft)
Depth: 16.3 m (53.48 ft)
Ice class: Arctic Class 4
Installed power: 5 × Krupp MaK 16M453C (5 × 5,880 kW)[4]
Propulsion:
  • Diesel-electric (AC/DC)
  • Three shafts (3 × 6,714 kW)
  • Three fixed-pitch propellers
Speed: 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph)
Range: 23,000 nautical miles (43,000 km)
Endurance: 205 days
Boats & landing
craft carried:
  • 1 × Zodiac Hurricane RHIB
  • 2 × workboat/lifeboat
  • 1 × LCM barge
Complement: 46
Aircraft carried: 2 × MBB Bo 105 or equivalent

CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent is a Canadian Coast Guard Heavy Arctic IcebreakerLouis S. St-Laurents home port is St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador[5] and is stationed there with other vessels of the coast guard.

Named after the twelfth Prime Minister of CanadaThe Right HonourableLouis St. LaurentPC CC QC LLD DCL LLL BA. The vessel is classed a “Heavy Arctic Icebreaker” and is the largest icebreaker and flagship of the CCG.

http://pic.twitter.com/UYJ6LaLCE6

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Who will catch the last Bluefin Tuna

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Unfortunately, the CITES meetings concluded without providing any trade protections whatsoever for severely depleted Atlantic bluefin tuna and four vulnerable species of sharks – scalloped hammerhead, oceanic white tip, porbeagle and spiny dogfish in 2010.

Description

Size: Exceed 10 feet in length and weights over 1,000 pounds, making them among the largest bony fish in the world. However, most are commonly see at 78 inches. One-year-old tuna are about 10 pounds and age 2-4 bluefin tuna are typically 20-80 pounds. ‘Giant’ is a subjective term used for mature bluefin tuna that typically are at least 10 years old and 200 pounds or more.
Color: Deep metallic blue dorsally – although on larger fish this can appear black – fading down the sides to silver with a silvery-white belly. Sometimes irregular iridescent white, grey, and silver bands and spots are on the belly. The first dorsal fin is yellow or blue while the second dorsal fin is red or brown. The anal fin and finlets are yellow and edged in black.
Body: Like all tunas, the body is fusiform, making the fish look something like a giant football. The body is tallest behind the operculum and where the pelvic fins begin. The body then tapers to the caudal peduncle. This tuna has a pointed snout and smaller eyes than other tuna species. Like most other tunas and pelagic bony fish, the dorsal, pelvic, and pectoral fins fit into slots in the body to reduce drag while cruising in the water.

At least 8.2 tonnes of the seized tuna documented in the report were below the size limit (pdf, p.47)—many around 1 kilo (2.2 pounds), indicating that they were only four months old when caught. In late October of last year, for instance, the Sicilian coast guard seized five trucks carrying around 3,000 such baby tuna, according to the report.

What’s to be done? Track the catch better, for one thing. Pew recommends that the EU scrap its paper-based catch documentation system in favor of electronic tracking, which will help buyers ensure that their bluefin purchases were legally caught. After several years of delays, the electronic system is finally set to launch in March of 2015. Considering the volume of tuna that will be killed in the meantime, that’s too long to wait, says Pew.