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Nova Scotia Lobster Wars

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 We consider the First Nations fishermen as brothers. Commercial fishing is the lifeblood of everybody here, including the First Nations. We expect the province to be doing what they say they’re doing, which is regulating the buyers.

GRAEME GAWN, SPOKESMAN FOR MARITIME FISHERMEN’S UNION LOCAL 9⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙⊙

WASTED LOBSTER     DUMPING ON ROADSIDE    TONS OF IT

At least the fox,bear,and feathered world will enjoy a feast paid for by the Canadian taxpayers. Kudos 

 

Lame up


The three known dumps on Briggs Road, in Weymouth, which sit side by side.

Lobster carcasses have been found in several locations around Weymouth, including three known piles on Briggs Road, over fifteen on Lombard Road, and around 30 piles along Weymouth River’s west side.
The land along both Briggs and Lombard roads has belonged Digby County resident Ben Robicheau and his family for over 50 years. He heard the night of September 14 that dumps had happened on the land.

While dumping of litter and trash is common, Robicheau says, “we’ve never seen any lobster dumped here before.”

Most of the dumps are located near existing, natural bumps and lumps in the forest. Some no longer smell and are sun-bleached, while others give off a rancid smell, are dark in colour and have bugs swirling around them.

 

WEYMOUTH, NS – Thousands of lobster carcasses were found freshly dumped in various areas in and around Weymouth September 15 as fishermen continued demonstrating outside the Department of Fisheries and Oceans.


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 The right to fish is protected under the Donald Marshall case, which reached the Supreme Court of Canada in 1999. The court found that alongside existing special licenses available to First Nations communities (food, social and ceremonial: and commercial) there is a third allowance that dates back to the treaties of the 1760s. Today, it’s called “moderate livelihood.” 


“In the Marshall case it included the right to have sufficient income to provide food, clothing, shelter and basic amenities,” Wildsmith says. “Something like [an] average income for a Nova Scotian.” 

But despite 18 years of on-and-off negotiations, the federal government has yet to produce an agreed-upon policy.

“People are tired of waiting,” Wildsmith says, “and you can’t blame them, after this length of time.” 

Under current “food, shelter and ceremonial” regulations, lobster fishing is permitted but selling isn’t. That’s where the protests come in. Demonstrators in Digby allege the Indigenous fishers are illegally selling their catch. 

The DFO seems to agree. Morley Knight, assistant deputy minister, told a lobster forum last month in Yarmouth there are “clear indications” of illegal sales happening.

Speaking off-the-record, one fisheries source agrees there may be a few “bad apples,” but the lion’s share amongst First Nations communities are “just trying to survive.” 

According to Wildsmith, there’s a real sense that all of the uproar is being fueled by the DFO’s continued labelling of the practice as illegal, instead of finally offering a “moderate income” license option. Despite bordering on two decades of negotiations, the DFO is still urging patience.

“Fisheries and Oceans Canada continues to engage, in good faith, with the Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaq Chiefs among others on the implementation of historic treaties, and it is through these and other processes that rights-related issues in the fisheries are being addressed,” reads a statement released from the department. 

“In the meantime, we expect all harvesters to continue to abide by the rules set out for an orderly, safe and sustainable fishery.”

That puts Mi’kmaw fishers in a tough spot, argues Wildsmith. 
Indigenous lobster fishers have to generate the money to purchase fishing gear, boats, fuel and equipment, all without ever selling their catch. 

“All those costs, you’re supposed to absorb, just to get some food?” 

Meanwhile, with no immediate resolution on the horizon, the pressure escalates. Without movement from the government, Wildsmith says, the situation can’t improve.

The right to fish is protected under the Donald Marshall case, which reached the Supreme Court of Canada in 1999. The court found that alongside existing special licenses available to First Nations communities (food, social and ceremonial: and commercial) there is a third allowance that dates back to the treaties of the 1760s. Today, it’s called “moderate livelihood.” 


“In the Marshall case it included the right to have sufficient income to provide food, clothing, shelter and basic amenities,” Wildsmith says. “Something like [an] average income for a Nova Scotian.” 

But despite 18 years of on-and-off negotiations, the federal government has yet to produce an agreed-upon policy.

“People are tired of waiting,” Wildsmith says, “and you can’t blame them, after this length of time.” 

Under current “food, shelter and ceremonial” regulations, lobster fishing is permitted but selling isn’t. That’s where the protests come in. Demonstrators in Digby allege the Indigenous fishers are illegally selling their catch. 

The DFO seems to agree. Morley Knight, assistant deputy minister, told a lobster forum last month in Yarmouth there are “clear indications” of illegal sales happening.

Speaking off-the-record, one fisheries source agrees there may be a few “bad apples,” but the lion’s share amongst First Nations communities are “just trying to survive.” 

According to Wildsmith, there’s a real sense that all of the uproar is being fueled by the DFO’s continued labelling of the practice as illegal, instead of finally offering a “moderate income” license option. Despite bordering on two decades of negotiations, the DFO is still urging patience.

“Fisheries and Oceans Canada continues to engage, in good faith, with the Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaq Chiefs among others on the implementation of historic treaties, and it is through these and other processes that rights-related issues in the fisheries are being addressed,” reads a statement released from the department. 

“In the meantime, we expect all harvesters to continue to abide by the rules set out for an orderly, safe and sustainable fishery.”

That puts Mi’kmaw fishers in a tough spot, argues Wildsmith. 
Indigenous lobster fishers have to generate the money to purchase fishing gear, boats, fuel and equipment, all without ever selling their catch. 

“All those costs, you’re supposed to absorb, just to get some food?” 

Meanwhile, with no immediate resolution on the horizon, the pressure escalates. Without movement from the government, Wildsmith says, the situation can’t improve.

https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/nova-scotia-lobster-wars-fishing-industry/article36593875/?ref=https://www.theglobeandmail.com&utm_medium=Referrer:+Social+Network+/+Media&utm_campaign=Shared+Web+Article+Links

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Why Not to go Plastic shopping

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We need to stop buying plastic things everyone can do without.

We need Think hard and read about the destruction as a result of buying.

We need to slow down before jumping in the car to shop for things we can do without.

We do not need more   We do need less

 We need to save a little for a rainy day because that day is coming.
Besafe

BeOcean
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Your Life in a little nutshell
http://www.cbc.ca/news/entertainment/blue-planet-2-1.4350287

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Chefs, Seafood Industry Leaders and Oceana Canada Help Combat Seafood Fraud | Oceana Canada

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http://www.oceana.ca/en/chefs-seafood-industry-leaders-and-oceana-canada-help-combat-seafood-fraud

An Oceana report on global seafood fraud found that that, on average, one in five of the more than 25,000 samples of seafood tested worldwide were mislabelled. Canada is no exception: studies have found that up to 41 per cent of Canadian seafood samples tested were mislabelled.

Despite growing concern about where our seafood comes from, we are routinely given little or no information about the fish we purchase. The information we are given is often misleading or fraudulent. We want to know where our fish came from, that it is what the label says it is, and that it is not harmful to our health or the health of ocean ecosystems.

We believe that robust traceability standards are needed for all fish sold in Canada, both domestic and imported. With about 1,700 different species of seafood from all over the world now available, it is unrealistic to expect chefs, restaurant owners, retailers and consumers to be able to independently determine that the fish they are getting is actually the one they paid for.

The European Union, the largest importer of seafood in the world, has implemented stringent catch documentation, full-chain traceability and comprehensive labelling requirements. The U.S. is moving quickly in this direction. However, Canada continues to lag behind two of its most important trading partners. Canadians deserve the same guarantee of consuming safe, sustainable and legal fish.

As seafood industry leaders, we call on the Canadian government to require that seafood be fully traceable from the point of final sale back to the point of harvest and incorporate key information about the who, what, where, when and how of fishing, processing and distribution. Only this way will we stop seafood fraud and keep illegal fish out of the Canadian market.

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LETTER TO

Dear Minister LeBlanc, MP, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, and Mr. Glover President of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency,

As consumers of seafood, we want to know where our seafood comes from, that it is what the label says it is, and that it is not harmful to our health or the health of ocean ecosystems. Despite these growing concerns, the little information we are given about the fish that we purchase is often misleading or fraudulent.

Seafood fraud has many forms, including selling cheaper fish as a more expensive variety, labelling farmed fish as wild-caught or masking black market fish as legally caught. This not only cheats our wallets and harms our health, but it also hurts honest fishers and contributes to illegal and abusive fishing practices that hurt the health of our oceans.

With more seafood imported into Canada, the path from the fishing vessel to our plate has become increasingly complicated, allowing for fraud and mislabeling at each step of the way. In fact, this bait and switch is widespread across Canada: studies have found seafood fraud and mislabeling in up to 41 per cent of samples tested.

We believe that better traceability standards are needed for all domestic and imported seafood sold in Canada. With about 1,700 different species from all over the world now available, it is unrealistic to expect consumers to be able to accurately identify the fish we purchase. By tracing seafood from the fishing vessel to the dinner plate, we can have more confidence in the food we eat.

In fact, the European Union, the world’s largest importer of seafood, is already doing this, and the United States is moving quickly in this direction. Unfortunately, Canada lags behind. Canadian consumers deserve the same guarantee that they’re eating safe, sustainable and legally caught fish.

As concerned Canadians, we are calling on you to require that seafood be fully traceable from the point of final sale back to the point of harvest. Only this way will we end seafood fraud and keep illegal fish out of the Canadian market.